University Studies


University Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi is a flexible undergraduate program that builds on academic credit students may have earned from a variety of sources and allows students the flexibility of designing a course of study that best fits their educational and career goals.  The degree can be completed as a BA, BS, or BAS, depending on the students' coursework, and consists of four components; first, the Core Curriculum Program (42 hours), second, a student-designed concentration, which must be approved in advance by the Chair of the Department of Undergraduate Studies; third, an area of supporting course work, which can include a minor, credit for prior learning military, or vocational credit; and fourth, the capstone, UNST 4350.


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(Click to view a video that explains options for the University Studies degree plan)

 

 

 


 

 

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(Click to view a helpful advising video for course registration. This one explains Learning Communities)

 


Minimum Degree Requirements

Students may obtain a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), or Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) in University Studies.  They must meet the following minimum requirements to obtain the degree. 

  1. 42-45 hours of the core curriculum
  2. 24 hours of a concentration
  3. 18 concentration hours must be upper division 
  4. UNST 4350 (Capstone)
  5. 45 total upper-division hours
  6. 30 upper-division hours in residence
  7. 120 hours overall
  8. Two freshman seminar courses (Students with more than 24 hours of transfer work are exempt from this requirement.)
  9. Foreign Language (either 2 years in high school or 2 semesters in college)

University Studies Admissions Proposal

Students who would like to complete a B.A./B.S./ B.A.S. in University Studies must submit a 450-500 word proposal before changing majors.  The proposal must include:

1. A discussion of your career goal and how a University Studies concentration will assist with that goal.  The discussion should include what skills are necessary to be successful in the career.

2. A discussion of which degree (B.A., B.S., or B.A.S.) you want to earn and why.  Students who wish to use vocational or technical hours toward the degree will earn a B.A.S.

3. Twenty-four hours of coursework that you feel would be appropriate for the degree, considering the career path.  Eighteen of those hours must be upper-division. Explain how the course content clearly relates to your career goals. 

4. The proposal must include proper spelling, grammar, and sentence structure as well as an overall cohesive format. Students should be sure to include an introduction, body with justification for course selections, and a formal conclusion. 

The proposal will be accepted or revisions will be requested.  Once the degree plan is approved, students will need to adhere to those specifics course requirements in order to obtain the degree.  Students may not substitute courses.   


Writing the Proposal

We ask students to consider their career goals and then to determine what skills they will need to be successful in that career.  

For some career paths, the course selection will be relatively straightforward.  For instance, students wishing to become social workers will likely need to obtain a Master’s of Social Work (MSW).  The MSW program will require several prerequisite courses (e.g. statistics, sociology, psychology, biology) in order to be admitted.  The University Studies concentration would consist of those prerequisites.   Or, maybe you already have a career and want to be promoted.  Your concentration would consist of classes that teach skills that your employer requires.

For other careers, it may not be that straightforward.  We encourage students to research their desired career and the necessary skill set.   Will your career require strong communication skills or advanced math?  Will you need to understand political science or history?  Will you need to know business management?  Once you know the skill set, students should research TAMU-CC course descriptions to see what course offerings match what they need.   Course descriptions may be found at http://catalog.tamucc.edu/content.php?catoid=5&navoid=155


Resources

If you are unsure of a career path, we encourage you to do some research.  Here are some possible places to begin:


Assistance

While this is a student proposal and is the responsibility of the student to complete, we definitely want to answer questions and help you find the right combination of courses.  Please feel free to contact us at any point to help guide you through the process.   


Program Contact Information:

Bill Coari
Program Coordinator
Islander Transition Center
Office: Faculty Center 148
Phone: (361) 825-2700